Fictional

I don’t think it’s fictional in the least.

Iwhat you are saying. I am sayin may be a mistake.

You keep telling me this.

Correct me if I am wrong again – the objects of the mind are the things of reality.

I know discourses do not inform you much but that is precisely why we should look at Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier who held out for 29 years after the end of the war refusing to believe the war had ended. Only when a senior officer he recognised came to relieve him of his duties did he surrender.

Now you have said, memories become fantasies, fictions. That they are indistinguishable.

I fail to see this as a proper argument. It was Heidegger also who fell into the same rabbit hole and it had dire consequences resulting in the (physical) death of people, and the trust of others. To not be able to discern fiction from memory of real place and time is to not understand the what is motivated by the senses and what is motivated by the perceptual apparatus.

Onoda’s refusal to see what is happening in the real world (that people are not fighting Philippines and that only an order from his command can relief him of duty is to not see that perhaps the command could not reach him to tell him directly, and for him to adapt to the new situation. This, to me, is dangerous. Indeed, it had led to a few more unnecessary deaths, and a whole lot more effort on the Japanese and Philippine governments, and resources to bring him to surrender and home to Japan.

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(I can imagine that you will scoff at this and say, “that is not evidence”. But then I will think, also, that maybe perhaps you are not unlike Hiroo Onoda, is still hiding somewhere (withdrawn) in the recesses of your own mind.)